It happens to most of us as we parent kids with disabilities, we hear statements like, “You are amazing, I could never do it.” “It must be so hard.”

I couldn't do it

Yes, it’s true, sometimes parenting kids with disabilities can be hard. We do have extra challenges that most parents of typical children don’t have to deal with, and our lives might look a little different than yours. But I hope you recognize that our lives look similar to yours too.

Can I be honest with you? Some of these comments – after a while – make me feel as if you think my child is not as lovable, and only certain people would be able to love my child or parent her. When you praise me for parenting my child, it says to me you feel fortunate she’s not your child because that would be hard and terrible and tragic. I know that’s not what you’re trying to communicate, I know that, but sometimes it does.

If I saw a friend with her typical child and I pointed at her kid and said, “I could never do it.” I think we would all agree it would be rude. That statement would say a lot about what I thought about her child, most likely not positive because I just said I could never do it. “What do you mean?” She’d probably ask offended. “I mean, it must be so hard to parent YOUR child!” Maybe right then she would have day dreams of punching me in the face. But I would not be surprised if she picked up her kid and walked away from me, offended, and reassuring her child he is loved, and wonderful, and she is lucky to be his mom.

It’s no different when I hear that. That’s how it makes me feel.

You see, the world tells us that disability is bad. When my youngest daughter was born with Down syndrome my midwife cried and the pediatrician shook his head and said he was sorry for giving us such bad news.

When we adopted our daughter who has cerebral palsy, a lady asked my husband, “Couldn’t you find a healthy one?”

Look back in history, we have not treated persons with disabilities as people. We have not treated them as equals. We still fight those messages and ideas today. Ask an adult with a disability how most of our society treats them, and think about how you would feel if you were judged based on your limitations. As the mother of two kids with disabilities, this pains me, because most people don’t know what I know, they don’t see what I see. They’re not part of our Friday night movie nights. Or our family vacations. They don’t see the pure joy of watching them dance and laugh and be kids. Disability is not a tragedy, what is tragic is how the world views disability.

I love my kids.  And I’m not extraordinary for loving them, I’m their mom! How could I possibly not love them? How could I possibly not be their advocate, their teacher, their greatest supporter? You don’t think you could do it? Yes, yes you could do it! You would do it because you love your kids. And I am who you would be if your child had a disability. Having kids with disabilities is not reserved for the special few. It happens to me, to you, to my neighbor, and to the millionaire. Disability is part of life.

Comments that praise me for loving my child suggest that while everyone else got high speed wireless internet, I’m stuck with dial up. I mean that stinks, dial up of all things! “So sad you can’t enjoy the internet or participate in social media like the rest of us, I could never do it, I could never do dial up. I know what high speed wireless internet is like, it must be so hard to wait for the dial while everyone else is already on Facebook.”

My child is not the least desirable option, she’s not dial up, she’s a person. She has a unique personality, gifts, talents, ideas, likes and dislikes,  a temper, a sense of humor, a big laugh, a tendency to melt my heart, and her arms wrap tight around my neck letting me know she loves me too.

mom

Please, don’t hear me say I don’t want your support or encouragement, because I do. If you think I’m doing a good job, just say that, “Hey, you’re doing a great job.” If you think I look frazzled and you see my child is having some difficulties, I might be having a hard day, and if you really don’t know how I do it, chances are I might not know how to make it through the day either, so what about, “How are you doing?” Open the conversation, ask questions, let me know you care.

But please remember, I’m not amazing for loving my child, neither are you for loving yours. It’s what we do, we love our kids.

Look at your child, because you know no matter what happens, you will never stop loving your kids and you would do anything for them. If there was an accident and your child ended up disabled, you would care for them and love them just as fiercely as you do now.

I don’t feel I got the wrong end of the deal, I’m not stuck with dial up. I feel like the luckiest mom to call these kids my own. Please don’t praise me for loving my kids, they are lovable, they are mine.

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